Sugar Content in Baby Food

So far, we’ve been buying baby food since it’s hard to find time to make our own.  We get the various jars and pouches that you find at the typical online and store retailers.  I’ve found that even then, it can be a time-consuming process to scour the various websites for which food to buy.  Of course I want to find the ones that are less expensive.  I want to find different varieties, to give WZW exposure to different foods.  And get a variety of ones with meat versus veggies.

In general, I’ve found Babies R Us to be disappointing, because even though we got a bunch of their gift cards at our baby shower, their prices are often higher than what you’d find on Amazon or the like.  And since we have Amazon Prime, we already get free 2-day shipping on most things, whereas with Babies R Us you have to pay for shipping, and it takes longer.  Now with the baby food, I find it annoying that they don’t have pictures of the nutrition labels, so even if I found something on sale, I’d have to cross-reference on other sites to check the labels.

Initially, I wasn’t checking labels too much, thinking that they would only have a few ingredients that were already listed on the front of the package.  But I quickly realized that there are all kinds of added ingredients.  Even with the baby foods that are pure fruit, the sugar content can often be quite high.  I don’t mind if he gets the sweeter all-fruit foods sometimes, but they often add apple or other fruit to make savory-sounding flavors taste better.  So if I’m not careful, even getting the ones that seem to have kale and spinach as the main ingredients end up also having sweet fruit added.

Once I started looking at labels, I realized that even with the baby foods that have no added sugar and are all fruit, you can still end up with 10 grams of sugar in a 4 oz pouch.  I know some of the fiber content helps, so it’s not like downing a cookie.  But still, I want to be mindful of what I give my son.  I was shocked when one yogurt and fruit-based baby food had a whopping 21 grams of sugar per 4 oz pouch!  Turns out they add concentrated fruit juice to it.  You might as well give your kid half a can of soda.

One of the brands I’ve found that has less sweet fillers is Earth’s Best.  They have pouches, but also have glass jars.  They do add starchy fillers like brown rice and whole wheat, but we’re not being THAT strictly Paleo for our son.  From what I hear from friends, different babies have different preferences, and some insist on feeding themselves from earlier on.  My guy still doesn’t mind getting fed from a spoon, and also does the pouches easily- which is nice for me, since they’re less messy.

I also bought a canister of puffs.  Again, they tend to have a lot of sweet varieties, but I found one that has a savory flavor.  I only give him a handful- like 5 to 10 in one sitting, and he can practice feeding them to himself.  And they don’t get messy.

Even in the recent TIME parenting newsletter, there was an article referring to a study done in the UK that showed that store-bought baby food was healthier and provided more veggies than homemade food:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jul/19/young-children-shop-bought-homemade-meals-study

But now that he’s getting older, I’m realizing that I’m going to have to deal with the messiness and have him start eating more regular food.  I had thought to myself that even if I prolong the pouch feeding, it’s not like he’s going to show up to kindergarten only eating pureed food.  Well, one friend said that her niece got spoiled by her family always feeding her.  So even at 3 years old, when a bowl of food was placed in front of her, she wouldn’t know what to do with it.  She would give my friend a look- wait, aren’t you going to feed me?

Part of the challenge is that it’s easy to revert to giving him starches- bread, rice, and noodles are so easy to feed babies.  So the thought of extra effort and time to figure out what healthier options to feed my son is a downer.  But after hearing the story above, I decided I needed to figure out options.  To start, plain scrambled eggs were quick and I already had the eggs in my fridge.  I figured they would be less messy than the yolk I tried before, and they are Paleo.  Well, turns out he had an allergic reaction.  Apparently it’s the egg white that has the protein that tends to cause allergies.

At first, I thought he was just bothered by the bib, which is not uncommon.  But then I realized he was breaking out in a rash around his mouth and under the jawline, above the neck.  I stopped feeding him, applied some hydrocortisone cream, and it rapidly faded.  It freaked me out a little seeing that for the first time.  Even though I figured it was probably just the rash, I was thinking to myself- please don’t go into anaphylaxis (an allergic reaction so severe, it affects breathing).

The baby books we have around the house said food allergies are common, and that most babies grow out of them.  These days, they recommend early exposure.  So I guess we should start exposing him to more of the common allergens, like peanuts, seafood, etc.  My pediatrician friend said I could try reintroducing the eggs in 3 months and see how it goes, but it can often take until kindergarten age to grow out of allergies.

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